THE CROOKED WOOD IN POMERANIA / POLAND


If only trees could talk to us. What strange stories would then submerge subsequently from densely wooded grounds like this weird forested site in the very North-West of Poland?

This most curious natural monument is situated Southern from the city centre of Gryfino at Nowe Czarnowo in Western Pomerania near the border to Germany. The fairytale forest consists of at least 80 pine trees showing a mysterious deformity and shape (other sources name 400 pine trees, but I have not counted them while being there). All of the trees have the same northward 90-degree bend at the base of their limb but despite bent beginnings, all of the trees have grown to be tall and seemingly unhampered by this deformation. There are traces of rowed plantings, however, the majority of trees are scattered about the normal pines. Some of them are in small groupings.

The most popular theory about how the trees became crooked is that a group of German farmers planted these trees in the 1930s, intentionally damaging the base in order to create some sort of product, perhaps uniquely shaped furniture.Β  The world may never know if it’s true because the German farmers were unable to finish their work due to their forced migration after World War II.

Others assume that a snowstorm could have knocked the trees like this, freezing them into a bent position until the snow and ice melted in spring.Β  There are plenty of trees in the area, all of which grow upright from the base without the funky curve distinct of the crooked trees. So the Crooked Wood remains an odd occurrence and unsolved mystery of exceptional green.

Jo’s Monday walk : Back lane beauty

 

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suburban tracks

I like travelling through the diverse realities and cultures of this world not only as a tourist. Nature, history of ancient sites or creative works are fascinating me however also abandoned places or ordinary things can be just magical and amazing. The multiple aspects and rich diversity of our blue planet need to be however nourished and protected. Please be so kind to respect that all texts, graphics or photos in this blog are protected by copyright. Unless otherwise mentioned by naming the individuali author, creator, designer or photographer all copyrights hold by suburban tracks. This is moreover an AWARD FREE BLOG! Thank you in advance for appreciation and kind understanding.

56 thoughts on “THE CROOKED WOOD IN POMERANIA / POLAND”

    1. I have read that a certain bending technique of trees exists likely for making special furniture, parts of boats and things like that. However, this area was devastated in WW II, the Germans who lived there had to leave and the region was completely abandoned till 1970 when new life started with the construction of a power plant next to this forest. So the Polish people living there today which came from other regions do really not know the detailed history of the place or possible explanations for the crooked trees. Thanks for the comment.

      Liked by 3 people

    1. Well, all the plants do exist much longer than our human species, nearly 500 millions of years. So they must have in fact discovered intelligent strategies of survival which till today are not completely understood by us. This is amazing.

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    1. This is now a lovely and peaceful place of common German and Polish history. The borders are now widely open for easy travelling in both directions what will hopefully continue in the coming future.

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  1. What a mysterious forest! My assumption is that the farmers used some special tubes. They applied it on the tree, forcing it to grow only within the tube. But we will never know πŸ™‚ Thanks for sharing this extraordinary destination!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I was astonished how many people were loafing around at that place, not ideal for making photos. But it was early Friday afternoon so the local people started their weekend there enjoying the nice weather, the wood or picnic. Thanks for the comment and suggestion with the tube.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I do not remember how I became aware of this site a few months ago before going there now in May. The place is not completely unknown, also the “New York Times” has already written about it. But I am sure, even a lot of people in Poland will not heard about it so far. Did not check whether it is mentioned in tourist guides as a local curiosity. May be.

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    1. Thank you very much, well it is not my theory but such curved trees i. e. normally oaks also known as “compass timbers” for wooden ship constructions, so the furniture idea seems to be more suitable because pine trees like here are often taken for such. But nobody knows for sure. How nice.

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    2. Thank you very much, well it is not my theory but such curved trees i. e. normally oaks also known as “compass timbers” for wooden ship constructions, so the furniture idea seems to be more suitable because pine trees like here are often taken for such. But nobody knows for sure. How nice. Best regards @ Ulli

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  2. This is such an amazing looking grove – that mystery adds to the allure of it and I cant believe I have never heard of it before. Thank you for sharing something so unique about a tree in this linkup!!

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    1. Thank you so much. I have already written some months ago about another strange natural place in Poland which is the “Roots Gorge” in the very South-East near Kazimierz Dolny being also worth a visit. Have a nice day!

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  3. That is so amazing! I had never seen a thing so interesting like this one. I am now curious to know why the trees are like this? There is sure some science behind this. So glad you decided to share this and join Thursday Tree Love. Welcome and looking forward to seeing you on the 23rd. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks a lot for getting back to me, and I am glad you found this interesting. Unfortunately no explanation for this weird occurrence, just theories and ideas. The resilience of plants sometimes just a nice mistery on flexible paths to go. Actually, no new posts planned for the next weeks, but in case an amazing plant passes my way, I will not forget to mention it again in your ThursdayTrees for sure. All the best in the time being @ Ulli

      Liked by 1 person

    1. An interesting place for sure while the direct surrounding area is not so spectacular, just normal countryside, but in the INTERNATIONAL PARK LOWER ODER VALLEY not far away a lot of nice places. And this natural reserve to be found both on Polish and German site of the river Oder which is also the borderline here. Here cranes passing by for a rest in Autumn from Scandinavia towards the South. Need to go there again this year. Thanks for passing by again.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. This is in short distance from Gryfino city center going Southern for around 2 km till Nowe Czarnowa near the German border. Google maps knows the place in any case. So it can not be missed if you plan a visit.

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  4. I like that you are spreading awareness of these unusual attractions in Poland. It is a hidden gem for travellers, I think. There are so many things to see. The comments relating to furniture may be correct, but there are various bending processes that can be applied to furniture after the timber is harvested, which make it bendy, so I feel that the farmers placed these trees in tubes or deliberately did this, perhaps as a time saving measure. Totally fascinating to wonder about their reasons.

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    1. Poland is in our direct neighbourhood, no problem to go there within 70 minutes, totally easy. There are various theories on this location, but all articles I have read on it (including the New York Times) came to no 100 % clear conclusion. A nice mystery.

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      1. Everywhere distributed in the great chaos of WW II, and owners were forced by the authorities to render rooms, till the mid 60s not enough appartments for all the people also in West-Germany. When I was born in 1957 my parents just had a small kitchen under the roof plus one room for sleeping in a family-owned house. The situation in Poland was not much different.

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      2. When I see the photographs from the end of World War II, it is quite amazing that reconstruction happened on the scale it did. I feel lucky to have seen the beautiful cities as they once were, even if they were not original. I am so very glad they decided to keep the old architecture, and not build concrete blocks, although they needed them for accomodating the population, by the sounds of things.

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      3. Till today, you can see the wounds of WW II also in Germany. But, you may still find hints on the 30-years-War (1618-1648) as well which is comparable to the two world wars and devastated Central-Europe vastly. Such traumatic experiences have an influence even after hundreds of years, some cities never gained again their former great relevance for example. Therefore, I am happy about the European Union, a project which needs to be successful! πŸ™‚

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      4. Indeed, but the EU does appear shaky economically, at times. Can you refer me to an example from the 30 years war? I would be interested to see that.

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      5. Well, there are a lot of examples for this 30-Years-War till today. In old German towns (such with timber houses) you find quite often only buildings erected after 1648 when this war ended. Vast landscapes were simply devastated, no people or villages or cities anymore. Nearly 20 % of the total population died in Central-Europe, approx. 6 million people, when the population in Europe was much less than today. A lot of places in Germany (usually on hills) are till today called SCHWEDENSCHANZE, these were places where the Swedish army had their artillery posted during the 30-Years-War. It was a European war which was justified with religious conflicts between the Catholics and Protestants. And when my parents married in 1951 (my mother Catholic and my father Protestant) this had to be effected in a Catholic church due to a treaty between the two churches. However, the Catholic priest in this village of my mother refused to shake hands with my father after the ceremony because my father was a member of the Protestant church, what he found disgusting!?

        Liked by 1 person

      6. That is so interesting. Building dating from after that time makes sense. I knew it was a long and destructive war but did not realize the extent of the scale of which you speak. Mind boggling! Swedenschanze! Wow – it really affected them. I must read up more about the details as I feel the effect must have been felt in Denmark and Northern Germany/Pommerania where my ancestors hailed from.
        The divide between the Catholics and the Protestants still has remnants here too, in the older generation. Even my mother-in-law was urging me and my husband to go and have a second marriage ceremony so that it could recognized by her church – the Catholic church, because in their eyes we weren’t married because we got married under a different creed. The kids that went to the convent schools did not even play with the kids from the government schools, even though they lived in the same street. Thank goodness attitudes and times have changed. Religion has caused so much conflict and trauma in the world, hasn’t it? And for what – a belief that exists only in our minds?

        Liked by 1 person

      7. I am now secular for more than 40 years. And belief is a personal matter for me. It should not guide our political decisions and systems because all religions stipulate to be the one and only truth and the more modern form of such are fascism or the marxist Ideologies. And still a lot of people belief that the human species is the best and most advanced species here on Earth, a huge and misleading error indeed.

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      8. Humans may be the most advanced species in their subjective eyes. Certainly not the kindest species.
        I am with you there on the secular. The Church and State should be kept separate, but just when one thought religious influence is all but finished, a conservative groundswell of evangelism rises up again. I think you might be right about fascism and marxism – at least there are loads of parrellels in terms of obsessive devotionalism, a dogmatic inability to see another viewpoint.

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