WHAT CLIMATE CHANGE REALLY MEANS

When I see the news in TV it embarasses me that the true effects of climate change in my country are only seldomky to be seen. Weather reports indicate again nice and dry weather although the lands would just require 2 or 3 weeks of continuous rain. This effectively means that the drought which commenced in April 2018 continues in large areas of Germany. The featured photo above of a lake looks seemingly nice, but something is wrong because the reeds are not standing in water anymore as usual, instead you see a new created sandy beach due to missing rain.

Desertificating bank of Bernsteinsee / Amberlake near Prenden, Brandenburg

Now also ecological borderland – view on German Frankfurt/Oder from Polish Slubice

On the last photo you should see normally the river Oder being the borderline of Germany and Poland here. But instead we just observe a predominant huge sandbank which made the river simply vanishing to nearly nothing optically on this not modified picture. Well, the river is still there behind the sandbank but with much less water than normally. Now, I can imagine why deserts are growing worldwide.

All photos here just actual messengers of the ongoing climate change shot in Eastern-Germany, August 2019.

 

 

A PROMENADE THROUGH OLD BEESKOW, GERMANY

An unplanned road trip to somewhere else finally led me to an old charming small city named Beeskow in Brandenburg (approx. 50 km South-Eastern of Berlin) which was founded in the 13th century. Fortunately great parts of the medieval city wall with now open gates and the usual guarding towers do still exist and really deliver a vivid and direct impression of times passed by.

Northern city gate leading to Storkow

View on St. Mary’s Church, 15th century, red brick Gothic style

Nice walk along the city wall

Urban scenery near the market-place

Stork Tower, 14th century

The beekeeper’s store in town

Description of the town from 17th century in ancient German:

“Besekau / An der Spree / 5. Meilen von der Chur-Brandeburgischen Vestung Beytzen / der Peyze und 3. Meilen von Fürstenwald gelegen / ein Städtlein / so albereit zur Nideren Laußnitz in der Land-Tafel gezogen wird; aber noch Brandeburgisch gestalt auch alhie ein Churfürstlich Hauß und Ampt ist. Es ligen herumb Storkaw / Mulrose / nahend Franckfurt / Schlaube / Mertensdorff / zur Fehre / Ledeleben / etc. so alle für etwas sonderbares gezeichnet werden; wir aber davon fast nichts zu berichten finden.”   (Topographia Electoratus Brandenburgici et Ducatus Pomeraniae, Merian, Frankfurt am Main, 1652, p. 30)

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P. S. The medieval author of 17th century was really looking here for something extraordinary but could not find it however in the small and charming city.
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ENCHANTED FOREST

In our neighbourhood at home one of our favourite trails for hiking leads through Briese Valley / Briesetal near the Northern gates of Berlin. The Briese is a small, not very long river flowing mostly in a glacial groover. Here you may find a wild alder swamp forest, beaver dams and marshland in quite original condition. During our recent visit nature has rested still in winter mode but at least some green to be admired on the watersurface.The nicest part of this trail starts at the village of Briese in the direction of Zühlsdorf over a distance of around 6 km. There it is possible to make a rest at a nice old forester’s lodge in the woods where you get small snacks (such as homemade deer sausage) and drinks during the weekend all year round and then go back on the other riverside with different views, a nice roundtrip of approx. 12 km.

 

 

Jo’s Monday walk : Natural beauty at Fonte Filipe