THE ROUTE IS THE FINAL DESTINATION IN AUSTRIA

Since the Romantic period, people have discovered nature for themselves, exploring it on foot and looking at it from new angles. Such wanderlust and outdooring (as well on very high mountains) has enabled a new direct, physical and sensual encounter with the also harsh heart of nature itself because the final goal of these rural ambitions may be also unreachable at times.

Sunrise on the road near Bartholomäberg

On the trail from Falla to Silbertal

Swiss horses on Gargellenalpe

Trail from Gargellen to St. Antönier Joch

Mural at the old city of Bludenz

Foggy morning view at Innerberg

Mountain huts on Kristberg

Finish area of a mountain-bike event at Schruns

 

Linked to:

Capelas, Sáo Miguel- not quite a Monday walk

 

ARCHAIC ENCOUNTER AT LAKE CONSTANCE

In Unteruhldingen, Germany, on Lake Constance, wooden posts in the water still serve as reminders of the houses that once stood there.

During the Neolithic Period (4,000 BC), the first farmers settled by the lakes around the Alps. They often built their villages directly in or by the water and protected themselves from the wet grounds and floods by building their homes on wooden stilts. These pile dwellings are an early form of settlement offering the people protection against enemies and predators. And the close proximity to water was also vital for survival by the direct access to the lucrative fishing grounds.

The pictures here were all taken some days ago at the Pile Dwellings Museum of Unteruhldingen, Lake Constance. This site comprises an open-air museum with 23 reconstructed houses from the Stone and Bronze Age (4,000 until 850 BC). After archeological excavations in the lake the first houses were reconstructed in 1922 based on replicas and original findings making a fascinating submerged world visible again.

Towards the end of the Bronze Age (approximately 850 BC), a dramatically worsening climate and rising lake level pushed the settlers back inland into the surrounding hills. Since then, the remains of the sunken villages have been resting well protected at the bottom of Lake Constance. Complex underwater excavations brought numerous finds of building parts which allowed for accurate reconstruction of the houses.

Other diverse finds can be seen in a small museum, and in the houses you get also a deep insight of ancient living conditions being really worth a visit.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Connections

MYTHICAL PLACES: THE HEATHEN-CAVES NEAR GOLDBACH

Heathen caves near Goldbach, steel engraving by Konrad Corrady, ca. 1850

The term ‘heathen caves’ was firstly used in the middle of the 17th century, and the term heathen is here used to describe the fact that the origin of such caves in the Western region of Lake Constance is going back to the pre-Christian period in Germany while nobody knows for sure who did the construction and when. Also the original purpose of these caves is unclear while a lot of legends still exist such as the unproven theory of the local geologist Dr. Schmidle published in the 30s of the 20th century alleging that the heathen caves were erected by the Romans and serving as sanctuaries for their Mithras cult. Roman coins were found near such caves otherwhere in the region, but this implies no real evidence. Unfortunately today there are only some small remainings of these heathen caves existing near Goldbach because starting from the middle of the 19th century until the 50s of the 20th century explosives destroyed them mostly in order to create free space for streets and modern railway connections. The original impression can only be imagined on old pictures such as the steel engraving by Konrad Corrady shown here.

Reconstruction of old village on pile dwellings from the Bronze Age
at Unteruhldingen, Lake Constance, Germany